Category: abuse crisis

7

Viganòrwellian newspeak: sanctions are sanctions, even when they are not

When Archbishop Viganò released his first testimony, he categorically claimed that Pope Benedict XVI had placed Archbishop McCarrick under canonical sanctions. He was very specific on the terminology he used and in what those canonical sanctions meant. He said, and I quote (emphasis not mine, but from the source material): “Pope Benedict had imposed on Cardinal McCarrick sanctions similar to those now imposed on him by Pope Francis: the Cardinal was to leave the seminary where he...

13

The Pagan law of Eternal Return and the faithful’s inconstancy

“Their position is quite reasonable; nay, in a sense it is infinitely reasonable, just as a threepenny bit is infinitely circular. But there is such a thing as a mean infinity, a base and slavish eternity. It is amusing to notice that many of the moderns, whether sceptics or mystics, have taken as their sign a certain eastern symbol, which is the very symbol of this ultimate nullity. When they wish to represent eternity, they...

10

Francis’ rosary call – let’s pray for our Church!

The Pope has issued an invitation to every Catholic worldwide: please take the month of October (a Marian month, since both the last Fatima apparition and the Miracle of the Sun happened in October) and pray a rosary everyday. Also, every faithful should conclude the rosary with a special invocation to Our Lady (the Sub Tuum Presidium) and with Pope Leo XIII’s prayer to St. Michael Archangel. This is completely in character with our dear Pope, one of the most Marian popes...

3

Letter of Pope Francis to the People of God: Only penance and prayers?

In the past month, the 11-page Viganò testimony has made rounds, creating highly polarized discussions in mainstream and social media. His letter included a series of allegations and accusations against Pope Francis and many Cardinals who were implicated in the cover-up of McCarrick’s sexual misconduct. However, in just one week, the story completely dried up “like a fig tree that bore no fruit” (as recently quipped to me by Pedro Gabriel). However, the noisy clamor...

18

Fake news and seething contempt for Pope Francis

Some Catholics disagree with much of what Pope Francis says and does — this is undeniable. Believe it or not, I don’t think there is anything intrinsically wrong with criticizing a pope on prudential matters, at least when done thoughtfully and when consideration is given to the context and circumstances around the pope’s decision or action. In recent months, however, I have noticed that some papal critics appear to respond immediately to anything he says...

12

Polarized over the pope, Viganò style

More than two weeks after the release of the sensational “Testimony” of former US apostolic nuncio Archbishop Carlo Maria Viganò, in which he calls for the resignation of Pope Francis, the Church finds itself in a period of intense polarization that’s difficult to assess. First, if you haven’t read it, I wholeheartedly recommend Greg Daly’s recent piece in the Irish Catholic, in which he heroically attempts to parse out what we know and what we...

8

Viganò admits: Francis not a part of gay lobby

In his polemical testimony, made public nearly a week ago, Arb. Viganò blamed most of the American Church’s abuse crisis on homosexual behavior on the part of the clergy (namely Arb. McCarrick.) However, this is not the only focus of his letter: he is equally critical of many clergymen who espouse a more “liberal” or “lax” view on homosexuality… and he seems to imply that Pope Francis is among them (or at least, an enabler...

8

If Even the Pope is Corrupt…

If even the Pope is corrupt, it means that I was drastically wrong about him. I have been drastically wrong before: I was once a Protestant! If even the Pope is corrupt, it means that I thought someone an eminently holy man who was not. It means that I still have much to learn about the love of God– but when has that not been the case? It is a lesson in humility and humiliation,...

15

Yes, the background is relevant: Behind Viganò’s “Testimony”

Two important stories broke on Saturday night (or Sunday morning, depending on where you are), and journalists and commentators around the globe have weighed in from all angles. There’s the story, and then there’s the story of the story. The first story is the most readily obvious: an 11-page “Testimony,” authored by retired Archbishop and former US Nuncio Carlo Maria Viganò, was released on the eve of the closing Mass for the World Meeting of...

20

We Confess a Holy Church

In my 32 years of life, most of the serious doubts about my faith have arisen primarily from confusion about the Church’s teachings and from a immaturity regarding spiritual matters. The present crisis affecting the Church is something different. I have true hope in salvation, and I feel the grace of God working in my life attracting me to greater holiness. Even still, recent developments–the abuses and pervasive coverup program recently unveiled to the public,...

15

Should the Pope resign?

Since the revelation of Archbishop Viganò’s letter, accusing the Pope of covering up for Bishop McCarrick’s abuses, there have been many people urging Francis to resign the papacy (starting with Viganò himself.) Many of those who make such pleas are highly critical of Francis’ pontificate, even (or especially) in unrelated matters, like his teachings and the pastoral direction he has given to the Church. These people would like to see him gone, no matter the...

1

Gänswein: Benedict will not comment on Vigano’s accusations

The following is a translation of an article from Die Tagespost. The original article can be found here. The private secretary of Pope Emeritus Benedict denies reports which claim that Benedict confirmed the reports of former Vatican diplomat Vigano. The claim that the former pope confirmed the reports is devoid of any truth and has no basis in reality. Archbishop Georg Gänswein, private secretary of Benedict XVI, has rejected the claim that the former pope...