Category: Amoris Laetitia

The train’s leaving the station: Cardinal Wuerl’s new guidelines

“The Church seeks to find different ways of demonstrating not simply a desire to accompany people where they are, but also to show we are walking with them in the concrete situations of their lives toward the truth, and so we can hear them and they can begin to hear us. In Amoris Laetitia, the Church is asked to proclaim the saving love of Jesus with joy. It invites us to be particularly aware of...

Father Weinandy and Divine Obedience

[D]ivine obedience never prevents us from obedience to the Holy Father. Nay, the more perfect the one, the more perfect is the other. And we ought always to be subject to his commands and obedient unto death. However indiscreet obedience to him might seem, and however it should deprive us of mental peace and consolation, we ought to obey…. – St. Catherine of Siena Father Thomas Weinandy is the former executive director of the USCCB’s Secretariat on...

With Man All Things Are Possible

Some Catholics wield Trent like a baseball bat. In their hands, Canon XVIII is a blunt instrument to beat the weak over the head with. Early in his pontificate Pope Francis criticized these Catholics for being what he called “self-absorbed Promethean Neo-Pelagians”. The mentality of the neo-Pelagians is an attitude that values strength and sufficiency, and likewise despises weakness and dependency. “With man all things are possible” is really the opposite of what Scripture says,...

The Role of Primacy in the Amoris Debate

Nearly two years later, there are few signs of a resolution to the ongoing intra-Church dispute over Pope Francis’ 2016 Post-Synodal Apostolic Exhortation Amoris Laetitia. Even prior to its release, going back to the preparations for the 2014-2015 Synods on the Family, segments of the Church and hierarchy have been locked in disagreement over the authority of the pope to change sacramental discipline for the divorced and civilly remarried. The conflict continues to focus on...

The Patriarchate of Lisbon’s faithfulness to Amoris Laetitia

In Feb 6th 2018, the Cardinal Patriarch of Lisbon D. Manuel Clemente has issued guidelines regarding the reception of Amoris Laetitia on his diocese. My good friend Filipe d’Avillez has provided us with an accurate english translation, which you can read at the bottom of this post. The original one (in portuguese), can be consulted here. By allowing the possibility of admission to the sacraments of certain cases of divorced and remarried couples with mitigating...

Communion for the Divorced and Remarried: a Defense of Amoris Laetitia

This article is a systemic summery of the most controversial section in Pope Francis’ Apostolic Exhortation, Amoris Laetitia. In doing so it addresses all of the major questions and objections that people have regarding the pope’s teaching on divorced and civilly remarried Catholics receiving Holy Communion. My desire is that this article will bring needed clarity to a nuanced and controversial topic. Please read and share it with others, it is going to be permanently linked on our...

Thomas Aquinas: Ghostwriter of Amoris Laetitia

  Pope Francis has stated multiple times that Amoris Laetitia is rooted in the moral theology of Thomas Aquinas. The citations to Aquinas in Chapter eight have been commented on by others, but quotations from the works of Aquinas are not the only way in which Amoris Laetitia (AL) draws on the Angelic Doctor. More fundamental is the Thomistic foundation that is not directly alluded to in AL but which nevertheless grounds much of the...

A Faith that Needs to Grow

“A faith that does not trouble us is a troubled faith. A faith that does not make us grow is a faith that needs to grow.” -Pope Francis on TwitterFebruary 1, 2018 Coinciding with the launch this week of Where Peter Is, these words of Francis could not be more providential. This message perfectly encapsulates the challenge that the gift of his papacy presents to Catholics around the world. In my introductory post for this...

Love the Pope!

The Pope is the guardian of dogma and of morals; he is the custodian of the principles that make families sound, nations great, souls holy; he is the counsellor of princes and of peoples; he is the head under whom no one feels tyrannized because he represents God Himself; he is the supreme father who unites in himself all that may exist that is loving, tender, divine. ~Pope Pius X Back in 2013 when Pope...